What is Gabapentin side effects ?

Along with Gabapentin needed effects, Gabapentin may cause some unwanted effects.

Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common

      1. Clumsiness or unsteadiness
      2. continuous, uncontrolled, back-and-forth, or rolling eye movements

More common in children

      1. Aggressive behavior or other behavior problems
      2. anxiety
      3. concentration problems and change in school performance
      4. crying
      5. depression
      6. false sense of well-being
      7. hyperactivity or increase in body movements
      8. rapidly changing moods
      9. reacting too quickly, too emotional, or overreacting
      10. restlessness
      11. suspiciousness or distrust

Less common

      1. Black, tarry stools
      2. chest pain
      3. chills
      4. cough
      5. depression, irritability, or other mood or mental changes
      6. fever
      7. loss of memory
      8. pain or swelling in the arms or legs
      9. painful or difficult urination
      10. shortness of breath
      11. sore throat
      12. sores, ulcers, or white spots on the lips or in the mouth
      13. swollen glands
      14. unusual bleeding or bruising
      15. unusual tiredness or weakness

Incidence not known

      1. Abdominal or stomach pain
      2. blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin
      3. clay-colored stools
      4. coma
      5. confusion
      6. convulsions
      7. dark urine
      8. decreased urine output
      9. diarrhea
      10. dizziness
      11. fast or irregular heartbeat
      12. headache
      13. increased thirst
      14. itching or skin rash
      15. joint pain
      16. large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, or sex organs
      17. loss of appetite
      18. muscle ache or pain
      19. nausea
      20. red skin lesions, often with a purple center
      21. red, irritated eyes
      22. unpleasant breath odor
      23. vomiting of blood
      24. yellow eyes or skin

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common

  1. Blurred vision
  2. cold or flu-like symptoms
  3. delusions
  4. dementia
  5. hoarseness
  6. lack or loss of strength
  7. lower back or side pain
  8. swelling of the hands, feet, or lower legs
  9. trembling or shaking

Less common or rare

      1. Accidental injury
      2. appetite increased
      3. back pain
      4. bloated or full feeling
      5. body aches or pain
      6. burning, dry, or itching eyes
      7. change in vision
      8. change in walking and balance
      9. clumsiness or unsteadiness
      10. congestion
      11. constipation
      12. cough producing mucus
      13. decrease in sexual desire or ability
      14. difficulty with breathing
      15. dryness of the mouth or throat
      16. earache
      17. excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines
      18. excessive tearing
      19. eye discharge
      20. feeling faint, dizzy, or lightheadedness
      21. feeling of warmth or heat
      22. flushed, dry skin
      23. flushing or redness of the skin, especially on the face and neck
      24. frequent urination
      25. fruit-like breath odor
      26. impaired vision
      27. incoordination
      28. increased hunger
      29. increased sensitivity to pain
      30. increased sensitivity to touch
      31. increased thirst
      32. indigestion
      33. noise in the ears
      34. pain, redness, rash, swelling, or bleeding where the skin is rubbed off
      35. passing gas
      36. redness or swelling in the ear
      37. redness, pain, swelling of the eye, eyelid, or inner lining of the eyelid
      38. runny nose
      39. sneezing
      40. sweating
      41. tender, swollen glands in the neck
      42. tightness in the chest
      43. tingling in the hands and feet
      44. trouble sleeping
      45. trouble swallowing
      46. trouble thinking
      47. twitching
      48. unexplained weight loss
      49. voice changes
      50. vomiting
      51. weakness or loss of strength
      52. weight gain

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Gabapentin is a prescription and we do not suggest you take it for a long time. You need take some health food or USANA CellSentials™ to make yourself more strong. If you want to make yourself happy and more beautiful without any pain, please check Celavive Skin Care and Whitening Teeth

Side effects requiring immediate medical attention

Along with its needed effects, gabapentin may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking gabapentin:

More common

  • Clumsiness or unsteadiness
  • continuous, uncontrolled, back-and-forth, or rolling eye movements

More common in children

  • Aggressive behavior or other behavior problems
  • anxiety
  • concentration problems and change in school performance
  • crying
  • depression
  • false sense of well-being
  • hyperactivity or increase in body movements
  • rapidly changing moods
  • reacting too quickly, too emotional, or overreacting
  • restlessness
  • suspiciousness or distrust

Less common

  • Black, tarry stools
  • chest pain
  • chills
  • cough
  • depression, irritability, or other mood or mental changes
  • fever
  • loss of memory
  • pain or swelling in the arms or legs
  • painful or difficult urination
  • shortness of breath
  • sore throat
  • sores, ulcers, or white spots on the lips or in the mouth
  • swollen glands
  • unusual bleeding or bruising
  • unusual tiredness or weakness

Incidence not known

  • Abdominal or stomach pain
  • blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin
  • clay-colored stools
  • coma
  • confusion
  • convulsions
  • dark urine
  • decreased urine output
  • diarrhea
  • dizziness
  • fast or irregular heartbeat
  • headache
  • increased thirst
  • itching or skin rash
  • joint pain
  • large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, or sex organs
  • loss of appetite
  • muscle ache or pain
  • nausea
  • red skin lesions, often with a purple center
  • red, irritated eyes
  • unpleasant breath odor
  • vomiting of blood
  • yellow eyes or skin

Side effects not requiring immediate medical attention

Some side effects of gabapentin may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects.

Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common

  • Blurred vision
  • cold or flu-like symptoms
  • delusions
  • dementia
  • hoarseness
  • lack or loss of strength
  • lower back or side pain
  • swelling of the hands, feet, or lower legs
  • trembling or shaking

Less common or rare

  • Accidental injury
  • appetite increased
  • back pain
  • bloated or full feeling
  • body aches or pain
  • burning, dry, or itching eyes
  • change in vision
  • change in walking and balance
  • clumsiness or unsteadiness
  • congestion
  • constipation
  • cough producing mucus
  • decrease in sexual desire or ability
  • difficulty with breathing
  • dryness of the mouth or throat
  • earache
  • excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines
  • excessive tearing
  • eye discharge
  • feeling faint, dizzy, or lightheadedness
  • feeling of warmth or heat
  • flushed, dry skin
  • flushing or redness of the skin, especially on the face and neck
  • frequent urination
  • fruit-like breath odor
  • impaired vision
  • incoordination
  • increased hunger
  • increased sensitivity to pain
  • increased sensitivity to touch
  • increased thirst
  • indigestion
  • noise in the ears
  • pain, redness, rash, swelling, or bleeding where the skin is rubbed off
  • passing gas
  • redness or swelling in the ear
  • redness, pain, swelling of the eye, eyelid, or inner lining of the eyelid
  • runny nose
  • sneezing
  • sweating
  • tender, swollen glands in the neck
  • tightness in the chest
  • tingling in the hands and feet
  • trouble sleeping
  • trouble swallowing
  • trouble thinking
  • twitching
  • unexplained weight loss
  • voice changes
  • vomiting
  • weakness or loss of strength
  • weight gain

Gabapentin and CBD Prescription, Which is better ?

Cannabidiol, or CBD, is a derivative of marijuana that has recently become available as a prescription drug, Epidiolex.

It is FDA-approved for two rare forms of childhood epilepsy, Lennox-Gastaut and Dravet syndromes, and was fast-tracked for that indication because of the dire need for treatment in children with these intractable seizures.

Meanwhile, the same drug has been available as a supplement for the past decade, called CBD oil. Many patients take this oil for its rumored mental health benefits, and you’ll need to know the basics when they request prescriptions for it.

CBD vs THC
Marijuana (cannabis) is a blend of over 100 cannabinoids, only one of which is tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the cannabinoid that is most responsible for the high people get from consuming pot. CBD, on the other hand, does not cause a “high,” although many people consider it to be somewhat tranquilizing. CBD also does not cause some of the problems seen with THC, such as cognitive impairment, anxiety, and (more rarely) psychosis. Those dangers are particularly relevant to adolescents, where the latest data show that marijuana triples the risk of psychotic disorders (Jones HJ et al, JAMA Psych 2018;75(3):240–246). CBD has neuroprotective properties, and it may actually lower the risk of psychosis and anxiety with THC. For more information, see the table “Cannabinoids From CBD to THC” above.

CBD in psychiatric disorders
In one of the most paradoxical clinical findings in recent memory, it turns out that CBD, far from causing psychosis, may actually be an effective treatment for psychosis. So far, 5 out of 7 controlled trials of CBD’s antipsychotic effects have been positive, and the latest of these is reviewed in this issue (Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci 2018;27(4):327–335). Another prescription CBD product, Arvisol, is undergoing phase I clinical trials in schizophrenia.

In addition to psychosis, there are a couple of small, placebo-controlled trials of CBD in social anxiety disorder. These looked at the drug’s acute effects when taken before a stressful social situation in 34 subjects. Compared to placebo, CBD had a significant effect, bringing anxiety down to the same levels reported by healthy controls (Blessing EM et al, Neurotherapeutics 2015;12(4):825–836).

Somnolence is the main side effect with CBD, but studies in sleep are mixed. Tolerance can develop to its sedative effects, and low doses (below 160 mg) can be stimulating (Babson KA, Curr Psychiatry Rep 2017;19(4):23). CBD does not appear to help bipolar mania or the cognitive impairments of schizophrenia.

CBD oil or Epidiolex?
Are CBD oil and Epidiolex really the same drug? They are both CBD, short for cannabidiol, but where they differ is in their purity and regulatory status. Epidiolex is a Schedule V prescription drug, the lowest level of regulation for a controlled substance. CBD oil is an ­over-the-counter supplement. It is legal in all states as long as it’s extracted from the hemp plant, a variety of cannabis that contains little THC and produces no high.

In terms of purity, CBD oil is a gamble. In a study of 84 online products, only 30% contained the amount of CBD on the label, and 21% contained THC (Bonn-Miller MO et al, JAMA 2017;318(17):1708–1709).

The FDA keeps a running tally of unacceptable products at www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/PublicHealthFocus/ucm484109.htm. Another good source is Consumer Labs, which tests products for purity and integrity. Among their recommended options, the best-priced oils are available at elixinol.com and bluebirdbotanicals.com.

The dosages used in psychiatric research range from 300 mg/day for anxiety to 800–1,200 mg/day for schizophrenia. The epilepsy dosage, 10–20 mg/kg/day, adds up to around the same amount used in schizophrenia for most adults. Cost is an issue with CBD, prescribed or not. A 300 mg dose is $20–50/day in the over-the-counter form and around $35/day for the prescription when paying out of pocket.

CBD, Marinol, and medical marijuana
CBD is in a very different category than dronabinol (Marinol) and nabilone (Cesamet), the other prescription cannabinoids. These are synthetic isomers of THC (Δ-9-THC) and are under tighter regulation than CBD (Schedule III vs Schedule V). They are only approved for nausea during chemotherapy and, in the case of dronabinol, anorexia in AIDS. As pure THC compounds without the protective effects of CBD, they may have even more psychedelic effects than marijuana (Bhattacharyya S et al, Neuropsychopharm 2010;35(3):764–774). “Medical marijuana” can refer to any marijuana component, such as CBD, or to the plant itself. It usually refers to the plant, which is legal with a prescription in 33 states and Washington DC. Each state has its own list of conditions that medical marijuana is approved for.

Side effects and drug interactions
The World Health Organization concluded that CBD has “a good safety profile” (WHO, 2018). Somnolence is its main side effect, and the PDR warns of elevated liver enzymes. On drug screens, CBD can cause a false positive for THC.

CBD may raise the levels of psychiatric medications through inhibition at UGT2B7 (lamotrigine, lorazepam) and CYP2C19 (diazepam and several SSRIs and antipsychotics). CBD itself is metabolized by CYP3A4 and CYP2C19.

Risks vs benefits
The FDA fast-tracked the approval of Epidiolex (CBD) because its risk-benefit profile is favorable for rare forms of epilepsy that are difficult to control with current anticonvulsants. The bar is higher for disorders with existing treatments, like psychosis and anxiety, and the data in these conditions are scarcer.

While we sort out these dilemmas, patients will no doubt experiment with the readily available CBD oil, so what should we do in the interim? We recommend the following commonsense approach.

TCPR Verdict: We don’t have much evidence to endorse or warn against CBD. Though it’s premature to prescribe CBD, we should guide patients to safer products if they are getting it on their own. That’s harm reduction, like suggesting to casual drinkers that red wine is safer than vodka

What is Gabapentin and What is the side effects of Gabapentin ?

Applies to gabapentin: oral capsule, oral solution, oral suspension, oral tablet

gabapentin-side-effects
gabapentin-side-effects

Gabapentin is used to help control partial seizures (convulsions) in the treatment of epilepsy. This medicine cannot cure epilepsy and will only work to control seizures for as long as you continue to take it.

Gabapentin is also used to manage a condition called postherpetic neuralgia, which is pain that occurs after shingles.

Gabapentin works in the brain to prevent seizures and relieve pain for certain conditions in the nervous system. It is not used for routine pain caused by minor injuries or arthritis. Gabapentin is an anticonvulsant.

This medicine is available only with your doctor’s prescription.

This product is available in the following dosage forms:

      • Capsule
      • Tablet
      • Solution
      • Suspension

The only conditions for which gabapentinoid drugs are FDA-approved to manage pain are postherpetic neuralgia (both gabapentin and pregabalin [Lyrica]) and diabetic neuropathy, spinal cord injury, and fibromyalgia (pregabalin only). Nevertheless, use of these drugs has tripled during the past 15 years. This increase likely reflects gabapentinoid use for managing non–FDA-approved pain conditions, in part to avoid opioid use. In this review, researchers identified 34 placebo-controlled randomized trials (with ≈4200 patients) of gabapentinoids for noncancer, non–FDA-approved pain conditions. Most trials’ durations were 4 to 12 weeks.

Results of the Gabapentin review were as follows:

      • Only weak evidence supports use of gabapentin for diabetic neuropathy (only pregabalin is approved for this indication).
      • Minimal evidence supports use of gabapentin for nondiabetic painful neuropathies.
      • Studies of gabapentinoids for managing low back pain or sciatica have been largely negative.
      • Only minimal evidence supports a clinically meaningful benefit of off-label gabapentin use for fibromyalgia (for which pregabalin is approved).
      • Both gabapentin and pregabalin are approved for managing postherpetic neuralgia, but both are used often for acute zoster pain, for which studies have shown no benefit.
      • A small number of studies of gabapentinoid use for other pain syndromes (e.g., traumatic nerve injury, complex regional pain syndrome, burn injury, sickle cell pain) showed no clinically important benefits.

Along with its needed effects, gabapentin may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

What is the side effects of Gabapentin ?

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking gabapentin:

More common

  • Clumsiness or unsteadiness
  • continuous, uncontrolled, back-and-forth, or rolling eye movements

More common in children

  • Aggressive behavior or other behavior problems
  • anxiety
  • concentration problems and change in school performance
  • crying
  • depression
  • false sense of well-being
  • hyperactivity or increase in body movements
  • rapidly changing moods
  • reacting too quickly, too emotional, or overreacting
  • restlessness
  • suspiciousness or distrust

Less common

  • Black, tarry stools
  • chest pain
  • chills
  • cough
  • depression, irritability, or other mood or mental changes
  • fever
  • loss of memory
  • pain or swelling in the arms or legs
  • painful or difficult urination
  • shortness of breath
  • sore throat
  • sores, ulcers, or white spots on the lips or in the mouth
  • swollen glands
  • unusual bleeding or bruising
  • unusual tiredness or weakness

Incidence not known

  • Abdominal or stomach pain
  • blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin
  • clay-colored stools
  • coma
  • confusion
  • convulsions
  • dark urine
  • decreased urine output
  • diarrhea
  • dizziness
  • fast or irregular heartbeat
  • headache
  • increased thirst
  • itching or skin rash
  • joint pain
  • large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, or sex organs
  • loss of appetite
  • muscle ache or pain
  • nausea
  • red skin lesions, often with a purple center
  • red, irritated eyes
  • unpleasant breath odor
  • vomiting of blood
  • yellow eyes or skin

Some side effects of gabapentin may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common

  • Blurred vision
  • cold or flu-like symptoms
  • delusions
  • dementia
  • hoarseness
  • lack or loss of strength
  • lower back or side pain
  • swelling of the hands, feet, or lower legs
  • trembling or shaking

Less common or rare

  • Accidental injury
  • appetite increased
  • back pain
  • bloated or full feeling
  • body aches or pain
  • burning, dry, or itching eyes
  • change in vision
  • change in walking and balance
  • clumsiness or unsteadiness
  • congestion
  • constipation
  • cough producing mucus
  • decrease in sexual desire or ability
  • difficulty with breathing
  • dryness of the mouth or throat
  • earache
  • excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines
  • excessive tearing
  • eye discharge
  • feeling faint, dizzy, or lightheadedness
  • feeling of warmth or heat
  • flushed, dry skin
  • flushing or redness of the skin, especially on the face and neck
  • frequent urination
  • fruit-like breath odor
  • impaired vision
  • incoordination
  • increased hunger
  • increased sensitivity to pain
  • increased sensitivity to touch
  • increased thirst
  • indigestion
  • noise in the ears
  • pain, redness, rash, swelling, or bleeding where the skin is rubbed off
  • passing gas
  • redness or swelling in the ear
  • redness, pain, swelling of the eye, eyelid, or inner lining of the eyelid
  • runny nose
  • sneezing
  • sweating
  • tender, swollen glands in the neck
  • tightness in the chest
  • tingling in the hands and feet
  • trouble sleeping
  • trouble swallowing
  • trouble thinking
  • twitching
  • unexplained weight loss
  • voice changes
  • vomiting
  • weakness or loss of strength
  • weight gain

You can not take Prescription for a long time, you need find a way to treat your pain without prescription. Exercising is the best way to relieve your pain. because exercising can enhance your immune system and increase your muscle strength and make your nerve strong.

You can also take some natural nutritions to increase your immune system too. Some anti-aging products can also increase your immune ability. You can try USANA Products ro make you strong. I take USANA Essentials every day and I find my health get better and better. You can also try to become a usana distributor or associate and eat health organic food to get rid of your headache or nerve pain.

If you want to make yourself happy and more beautiful without any pain, please check Celavive Skin Care and Whitening Teeth

Gabapentin Dosage Guide

Usual Adult Dose for Epilepsy

Initial dose: 300 mg orally on day one, 300 mg orally 2 times day on day two, then 300 mg orally 3 times a day on day three
Maintenance dose: 300 to 600 mg orally 3 times a day
Maximum dose: 3600 mg orally daily (in 3 divided doses)
-Maximum time between doses in the 3 times a day schedule should not exceed 12 hours

-The safety and effectiveness of gabapentin available under the trade name Gralise (R) or Horizant (R) in patients with epilepsy has not been studied.

Comment:
-May be taken with or without food.
-Half-tablets not used within 28 days of breaking the scored tablet should be discarded.

Use: Adjunctive therapy in the treatment of partial onset seizures, with and without secondary generalization

Usual Adult Dose for Postherpetic Neuralgia

-Initial dose: 300 mg orally on day one, 300 mg orally 2 times day on day two, then 300 mg orally 3 times a day on day three
-Titrate up as needed for pain relief
-Maximum dose: 1800 mg per day (600 mg orally 3 times a day)
COMMENT:
-May be taken with or without food.
-Half-tablets not used within 28 days of breaking the scored tablet should be discarded.

Gabapentin available under the trade name GRALISE (R):

-Maintenance dose: Gralise (R) should be titrated to 1800 mg orally once daily with the evening meal.

-Recommended titration schedule:
Day 1: 300 mg orally with the evening meal
Day 2: 600 mg orally with the evening meal
Days 3 through 6: 900 mg orally with the evening meal
Days 7 through 10: 1200 mg orally with the evening meal
Days 11 through 14: 1500 mg orally with the evening meal
Day 15: 1800 mg orally with the evening meal

COMMENT:
-Gralise (R) is not interchangeable with other gabapentin products because of differing pharmacokinetic profiles that affect the frequency of administration.

Gabapentin enacarbil extended release tablets are available under the trade name HORIZANT (R):
-The recommended dosage is 600 mg orally 2 times a day. Therapy should be initiated at a dose of 600 mg orally in the morning for 3 days of therapy, then increased to 600 mg 2 times a day (1200 mg/day) on day four.

COMMENT:
Gabapentin enacarbil extended release tablets available under the trade name Horizant (R) and gabapentin are not interchangeable.

Use: Postherpetic neuralgia

Usual Adult Dose for Restless Legs Syndrome
Gabapentin enacarbil available under the trade name Horizant (R):
600 mg orally once daily with food at about 5 PM

Comment:
-May be taken with or without food.

Use: For the treatment of moderate-to-severe primary Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) in adults

Usual Pediatric Dose for Epilepsy

Less than 3 years: Not recommended

Greater than or equal to 3 and less than 12 years:
Starting Dose: Ranges from 10 to 15 mg/kg/day in 3 divided doses
Effective Dose: Reached by upward titration over a period of approximately 3 days; the effective dose in patients 5 years of age and older is 25 to 35 mg/kg/day in divided doses (3 times a day). The effective dose in pediatric patients ages 3 and 4 years is 40 mg/kg/day and given in divided doses (3 times a day). Gabapentin may be administered as the oral solution, capsule, or tablet, or using combinations of these formulations. Dosages up to 50 mg/kg/day have been well tolerated in a long term clinical study. The maximum time interval between doses should not exceed 12 hours.

Greater than 12 years:
-Initial dose: 300 mg orally on day one, 300 mg orally 2 times a day on day two, then 300 mg orally 3 times a day on day three
-Maintenance dose: 900 to 1800 mg orally in 3 divided doses; the dose may be increased up to 1800 mg/day. Dosages up to 2400 mg/day have been well tolerated in long term clinical studies. Doses of 3600 mg/day have also been administered to a small number of patients for a relatively short duration, and have been well tolerated. The maximum time between doses in the three times a day schedule should not exceed 12 hours.

Use: Adjunctive therapy in the treatment of partial onset seizures, with and without secondary generalization in patients 3 years of age and older

Renal Dose Adjustments
For patients greater than or equal to 12 years:
-CrCl greater than 60 mL/min: 300 to 1200 mg orally 3 times a day
-CrCl 30 to 59 mL/min: 200 to 700 mg orally daily; increase to 600 mg as needed
-CrCl 15 to less than 29 mL/min: 200 to 700 mg orally once a day
-CrCl 15 mL/min: 100 to 300 mg orally every other day
-CrCl less than 15 mL/minute: Reduce daily dose in proportion to CrCl based on dose for CrCl 15 mL/minute (e.g., for a CrCl of 7.5 mL/min, reduce the daily dose by one-half to 50 to 150 mg/day)
-Hemodialysis: Dose based on CrCl plus a single supplemental dose of 125 to 350 mg given after each 4 hours of hemodialysis
-Use of this drug in patients less than 12 years of age with compromised renal function has not been studied.

The dose of gabapentin available under the trade name GRALISE (R) should be adjusted in patients with reduced renal function. Patients with reduced renal function should initiate GRALISE (R) at a daily dose of 300 mg. Daily dosing in patients with reduced renal function should be individualized based on tolerability and desired clinical benefit. GRALISE (R) should be titrated following the schedule outlined below:
Hemodialysis: Not recommended
CrCl less than 30 mL/min: Not recommended
CrCl 30 to 60 mL/min: 600 to 1800 mg orally with the evening meal
CrCl greater than or equal to 60 mL/min: 1800 mg orally with the evening meal

The dose of gabapentin enacarbil available under the trade name HORIZANT (R) should be adjusted in patients with reduced renal function as follows:
RESTLESS LEGS SYNDROME:
-CrCl less than 15 mL/min on hemodialysis: Not recommended
-CrCl less than 15 mL/min: 300 mg orally every other day
-CrCl 15 to 29 mL/min: 300 mg orally once a day
-CrCl 30 to 59 mL/min: Start at 300 mg orally daily and increase to 600 mg as needed
-CrCl greater than or equal to 60 mL/min: 600 mg orally once a day
POSTHERPETIC NEURALGIA:
-CrCl less than 15 mL/min on hemodialysis: 300 mg orally following every dialysis; increase to 600 mg orally following every dialysis if needed
-CrCl less than 15 mL/min: 300 mg orally every other day in the AM; increase to 300 mg orally once daily in the AM if needed
-CrCl 15 to 29 mL/min: 300 mg orally in the morning on day 1 and day 3 of therapy, then 300 mg once a day in the morning; may increase to 300 mg orally 2 times a day if needed; when tapering: if taking 300 mg orally 2 times a day, reduce to 300 mg orally once a day in the AM for 1 week; if taking 300 mg orally once a day no taper is needed
-CrCl 30 to 59 mL/min: 300 mg orally in the AM for 3 days, then 300 mg orally 2 times a day; increase to 600 mg orally 2 times a day as needed; when tapering: reduce current maintenance dose to once daily in the AM for 1 week
-CrCl greater than or equal to 60 mL/min: 600 mg orally in the morning for 3 days, then 600 mg orally 2 times a day thereafter; when tapering: 600 mg orally in the AM for 1 week

Liver Dose Adjustments
Data not available

Dose Adjustments
Because elderly patients are more likely to have decreased renal function, the dose of this drug should be adjusted based on CrCl values.

GRALISE (R):
-If the dose of this drug under the trade name Gralise (R) is reduced, discontinued, or substituted with an alternative medication, this should be done gradually over a minimum of 1 week or longer or as directed by the physician.

HORIZANT (R):
-If the dose of this drug available under the trade name Horizant (R) is discontinued, patients with RLS receiving 600 mg or less once daily can discontinue the drug without tapering. If the recommended dose is exceeded, the dose should be reduced to 600 mg daily for 1 week prior to discontinuation to minimize the potential of withdrawal seizure.
-Patients with PHN receiving Horizant (R) twice daily should reduce the dose to once daily for 1 week prior to discontinuation to minimize the potential for withdrawal seizure.

Precautions
-Safety and efficacy have not been established in patients younger than 18 years in the management of postherpetic neuralgia.
-Safety and efficacy have not been established in patients younger than 3 years in the adjunctive treatment of partial seizures.
-Safety and efficacy have not been established in patients younger than 18 years for gabapentin available under the trade names Gralise (R) or Horizant (R).

Consult WARNINGS section for additional precautions.

Dialysis
For patients greater than or equal to 12 years:
-Hemodialysis: Dose based on CrCl plus a single supplemental dose of 125 to 350 mg given after each 4 hours of hemodialysis

GRALISE (R): Hemodialysis: Not recommended

HORIZANT (R):
RESTLESS LEGS SYNDROME:
-CrCl less than 15 mL/min on hemodialysis: Not recommended
POSTHERPETIC NEURALGIA:
-CrCl less than 15 mL/min on hemodialysis: 300 mg orally following every dialysis; increase to 600 mg orally following every dialysis if needed

Other Comments
Administration advice:
-This drug may be given with or without food.
-Tablets should be swallowed whole and should not be cut, crushed, or chewed.
-Gabapentin enacarbil available under the trade name Horizant (R) should be taken with food.
-Gabapentin available under the trade name Gralise (R) should be taken with food with the evening meal.
-Gabapentin available under the trade names Gralise (R) and Horizant (R) should be swallowed whole, not crushed, split, or chewed.

General:
Horizant (R) and Gralise (R) are not interchangeable with other gabapentin products because of differing pharmacokinetic profiles.
-If gabapentin is discontinued and/or an alternate anticonvulsant medication is added to the therapy, this should be done gradually over a minimum of 1 week.
-Gabapentin available under the trade names Gralise (R) or Horizant (R) are not interchangeable with each other or with other gabapentin products.

Gabapentin can be used to treat more than 30 diseases

Gabapentin is used with other medications to prevent and control seizures. It is also used to relieve nerve pain following shingles (a painful rash due to herpes zosterinfection) in adults. Gabapentin is known as an anticonvulsant or antiepileptic drug.

OTHER USES: This section contains uses of this drug that are not listed in the approved professional labeling for the drug but that may be prescribed by yourhealth care professional. Use this drug for a condition that is listed in this section only if it has been so prescribed by your health care professional.

Gabapentin may also be used to treat other nerve pain conditions (such as diabetic neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, trigeminal neuralgia) and restless legs syndrome.

Gabapentin can also be used to treat following health conditions:

  • Alcohol Withdrawal
  • Anxiety
  • Benign Essential Tremor
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Burning Mouth Syndrome
  • Cluster-Tic Syndrome
  • Cough
  • Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy
  • Epilepsy
  • Erythromelalgia
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Hiccups
  • Hot Flashes
  • Hyperhidrosis
  • Insomnia
  • Lhermitte’s Sign
  • Migraine
  • Nausea/Vomiting, Chemotherapy Induced
  • Neuropathic Pain
  • Occipital Neuralgia
  • Pain
  • Periodic Limb Movement Disorder
  • Peripheral Neuropathy
  • Postherpetic Neuralgia
  • Postmenopausal Symptoms
  • Pruritus
  • Pudendal Neuralgia
  • Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome
  • Restless Legs Syndrome
  • Small Fiber Neuropathy
  • Spondylolisthesis
  • Syringomyelia
  • Transverse Myelitis
  • Trigeminal Neuralgia
  • Vulvodynia